The Westerlies

July 23rd, 2014

Jazz photographer Daniel Sheehan photographed the jazz horn group the Westerlies in Seattle.
In June Earshot Jazz presented the Westerlies in concert at the Seattle Art Museum. Having taken New York by storm, former Seattle residents Riley Mulherkar, Zubin Hensler (trumpets), Willem de Koch and Andy Clausen (trombones) return as the new-music brass quartet the Westerlies. And Horvitz’s all-star improvising conduction ensemble charms at their home venue.

The Westerlies emphasize original composition and improvisation in conventional chamber music, aiming to create in the ever-narrowing gap between contemporary classical composition, jazz-influenced improvisation and North American folk music. The Westerlies seek to present chamber music as an organic and dynamic means of artistic expression in the twenty-first century.

Jazz photographer Daniel Sheehan photos of Darius Jones and Tarbaby
After Ambrose Akinmusire Quintet opened at the Seattle Art Museum in the 2014 Earshot Jazz Summer Concert Series, Darius Jones played a set with Tarbaby.

Alto saxophonist Darius Jones has a deep-soulful sound that can pur, bark, soothe, and savage. The Brooklyn-based hornman is emerging as a one of the most talented and exciting leaders in an increasingly packed field. As a leader and composer, he displays savvy, intuitive skills that are equally moving and thrilling. Fittingly, then, he teams here with Tarbaby, an “expandable, organic situation” that Ben Ratliff explained in the New York Times: They are “loud and authoritative and elastic within composed boundaries,” and listening to them “you feel they’re in a continuous tradition — you can hear the learning in their hands — and yet they’re all over the place.” They’re that good. No wonder, when they boast as core members the Grammy Award-winning bassist and composer Eric Revis, on keyboards Aruán Ortiz, and on drums, one of their most riveting current exponents, Nasheet Waits.

Jazz photographer Daniel Sheehan photos of Darius Jones and Tarbaby

John Hollenbeck Cludia Quintet plays at the 2013 Earshot Jazz Festival

Drummer John Hollenbeck’s genre-defying quintet – bassist Drew Gress, saxophonist Chris Speed, vibraphonist Matt Moran and accordionist Red Wierenga – returned to Seattle Sunday night and played with with driving rhythms, quirky melodies and stunning virtuosity as the 2013 Earshot Jazz Festival ended its first weekend.

Composer and leader Hollenbeck launched Claudia as a band in the late 90s, with a sound determined by the compositions, instrumentation and these performers, whose exceptional artistry and character is revealed in Hollenbeck’s original compositions. In the course of the hundreds of concerts and thousands of miles this New York City ensemble has traveled together, the Claudia Quintet has developed a dynamic live sound based on trust and spontaneity.

Here is a link to the Earshot Jazz Festival website  schedule for the rest of the Festival.

John Hollenbeck Cludia Quintet plays at the 2013 Earshot Jazz Festival

John Hollenbeck Cludia Quintet plays at the 2013 Earshot Jazz Festival

 

Here is a link to the Earshot Jazz Festival website  schedule for the rest of the Festival.

 

Seattle jazz festival photographs by jazz photographer Daniel Sheehan

Last night the 2013 Earshot Jazz Festival kicked off with two shows, Keith Jarrett, Gary Peacock, Jack DeJohnette at BENAROYA HALL and Industrial Revelation at TULA’S. They were both formidable performances. Here are pictures from Industrial Revelation since Keith Jarrett is camera shy.
Widely regarded as the best drummer in Seattle, D’Vonne Lewis proppeled Seattle’s homegrown, hard-hitting post-genre quartet – with bassist Evan Flory-Barnes, Rhodes pianist Josh Rawlings and trumpeter Aham Oluo – through epic, improvised jams.

Here is a link to the Earshot Jazz Festival website  schedule for the rest of the Festival.

Seattle jazz festival photographs by jazz photographer Daniel Sheehan

 

Formed in 2005 with the collective interest to build a group that would have the ability to express freely, outside a specific genre or label, and to play with the utmost passion, Industrial Revelation has brought considerable thunder to Seattle club dates. They’ve released It Can Only Get Better From Here, a live recording containing a single twenty-minute song, and their debut studio album Unreal Reality, with guests Owuor Arunga, trumpet (Macklemore), and Seattle soul singer Choklate (Vitamin D, Darrius Willrich).

 

Seattle jazz festival photographs by jazz photographer Daniel Sheehan

Seattle jazz festival photographs by jazz photographer Daniel Sheehan

Seattle jazz festival photographs by jazz photographer Daniel Sheehan

Seattle jazz festival photographs by jazz photographer Daniel Sheehan

Seattle jazz festival photographs by jazz photographer Daniel Sheehan
Also in that time, members Flory-Barnes and Oluo have premiered longform musical opuses mixing multiple aspects of their own talents and the talents of their colleagues – the Meet the Composer commissioned Acknowledgement of a Celebration by Flory-Barnes and Now I’m Fine by Oluo.

Industrial Revelation is celebrating their recent Oak Head release.

Here is a link to the Earshot Jazz Festival website  schedule for the rest of the Festival.

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Cameron Sharif (keyboard), Ray Larsen (trumpet), Mark Hunter (bass), Evan Woodle (drums)

Following Syrinx Effect last Thursday evening was yet another band arising from Seattle’s embarrassment of avant-jazz riches, Chemical Clock,  an aggressive and determined young band with a lot of good ideas and more than enough chops to pull them off. Led by keyboardist and composer Cameron Sharif, the quartet’s self-titled debut CD EP is a brief and refreshing blast of post-everything avant fusion. Keep in mind that the word “fusion” is a bit loaded. Fusion, to Sharif and his colleagues, means something very different than it did back in the 20th century. The combination of Ray Larsen’s electric trumpet and Shari’s electric keys might suggest a set inspired by Miles Davis’ Bitches Brew (Columbia, 1969) – but while such influences are unavoidable, Chemical Clock is not about reinterpreting or regurgitating the past. Indeed, there is very little nostalgia going on here. The fusion here encompasses aspects of jazz, electronic dance music, prog-metal, contemporary classical music, and the indefinable electro-acoustic music currently being explored by edgy rock bands such as Lightning Bolt and Hella.

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The Earshot Jazz 2013 Spring Series continues and last night presented the Refuge Trio. John Hollenbeck, above, played at the Chapel Performance Space  with Theo Bleckmann on voice and Gary Versace on piano & keyboard in an amazing performance of various originals and covers.

Refuge Trio takes its name from the Joni Mitchell song “Refuge of the Roads”. The collaborative trio was formed to play at the 2002 Wall-to-Wall Joni Mitchell Marathon Concert at Symphony Space in NYC. Since then, they have continued to explore delicate and playful music with mystery and exuberance. Their unique voices also play an essential role in the ensembles of Laurie Anderson, Meredith Monk, Bob Brookmeyer, John Scofield and Maria Schneider. As the Refuge trio, they fashion a transformative experience for the audience with their music and spirit.

 

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Dutch jazz sax musician Tineke Postma
The internationally acknowledged Dutch jazz saxophonist Tineke Postma played at Earshot Jazz Art of Jazz series at SAM last night. She played a wonderful set and will play again on Saturday opening for Grace Kelly at the Kirkland Performance Center. She is in the US for a series of concerts throughout the country, including Portland, Washington DC, and New York City.
Dutch jazz sax musician Tineke Postma Dutch jazz sax musician Tineke Postma Dutch jazz sax musician Tineke Postma

Jazz Photography of the Instant Composers Pool Orchestra performs in Seattle.

The Earshot Jazz Spring Series brought he ICPO live on Stage at the Seattle Art Museum on April 3rd to an almost full house. One of the most wonderful performances I can remember seeing in a long time. I always really enjoy seeing Han Bennink perform but the whole ensemble this time was memorable.

“Bit-by-bit zany and artistically and technically brilliant, the ICP Orchestra is likely the globe’s most startling and ear-stretching jazz ensembles. This lineup of the world’s greatest collaborative improvisers was minus it’s founding pianist Misha Mengelberg, now in his late seventies.

Mengelberg and drummer Han Bennink, along with Willem Breuker, formed the group in Amsterdam in 1967, in the full throes of the free-jazz movement. The ICP Orchestra was then, and remains now, a marvel of instant composition driven by the spontaneity and idiosyncrasy of its members. In that lineup of maverick contributors: trombonist Wolter Wierbos, bassist Ernst Glerum, clarinetist and saxophonist Ab Baars, tenor saxophonist Tobias Delius, multi-reeds hornman Michael Moore, trumpeter Thomas Heberer, violist Mary Oliver, and cellist Tristan Honsinger.” – Peter Monaghan Read more on Earshot Jazz

Jazz Photography of the Instant Composers Pool Orchestra with Han Bennink, performs in Seattle.

Jazz Photography of the Instant Composers Pool Orchestra performs in Seattle.

Jazz Photography of the Instant Composers Pool Orchestra performs in Seattle.

Jazz Photography of the Instant Composers Pool Orchestra performs in Seattle.

Jazz Photography of the Instant Composers Pool Orchestra performs in Seattle.

Jazz Photography of the Instant Composers Pool Orchestra performs in Seattle.

Jazz Photographer Daniel Sheehan' jazz photo of Han Bennink performing with the Instant Composers Pool Orchestra on stage at the Seattle Art Museum.

 

Thomas Marriott plays with his jazz band Flexicon at the Seattle Jazz CLub Tula's.

 

Thomas Marriott’s Flexicon with Rick Mandyck on piano, Paul Gabrielson on bass, John Bishop on drums.
The 2012 Golden Ear Awards, celebrating the contributions and achievements in Seattle jazz, were presented at Tula’s on March 20 and Flexicon opened the evening. Here are some images from the evening of great sounds from some guys who have been around for a while.

 

Thomas Marriott plays with his jazz band Flexicon at the Seattle Jazz CLub Tula's.

Thomas Marriott plays with his jazz band Flexicon at the Seattle Jazz CLub Tula's.

Thomas Marriott plays with his jazz band Flexicon at the Seattle Jazz CLub Tula's.

Thomas Marriott plays with his jazz band Flexicon at the Seattle Jazz CLub Tula's.

Monday night at the Triple Door as the 2012 Earshot Jazz festival enters another week of wonderful performances, The  Royal Room Collective Music Ensemble put on a great set The Royal Room Collective Music Ensemble is a  conduction group led by Wayne Horvitz, featuring many of the same musicians as the Voodoo Orchestra who they were opening for: drums Bobby Previte, saxophones Greg Sinibaldi, Neil Welch, Kate Olson, bass clarinet Beth Fleenor, trumpets Al Keith, Samantha Boshnack, Steve O’Brien, trombones Naomi Siege, Jacob Herring, French horn Tom Varner, string bass Geoff Harper and piano Ryan Burns.

Click on the schedule here 2012 Earshot Jazz Festival  continues.

 

The Royal Room Collective operates around a unique system of instant arranging fueled by musical symbols that Horvitz newly created specifically for this music.

– NB